David Sherman, Ph.D.

Full Professor, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute
Adjunct Associate Professor , Department of Global Health, University of Washington
Area of Expertise: tuberculosis, drug discovery, systems biology

Biography

Education

Ph.D.    Biochemistry    Vanderbilt University

A.B.      Zoology           University of California, Berkeley

Professional Experience

  • Director, Tuberculosis Program, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 2007 - present
  • Full Professor, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 2009 - present
  • Member, Pathobiology Graduate Program, Department of Global Health, University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, 2008 - present
  • Affiliate Associate Professor, Department of Global Health, University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, 2007 - present
  • Associate Member, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 2007 - 2009
  • Associate Professor, Pathobiology Department, University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, 2004 - 2008
  • Assistant Professor, Pathobiology Department,
    University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, 1998 - 2004
  • Senior Scientist, Department of Research Biology, PathoGenesis Corporation, 1994 - 1998
  • Research Assistant Professor of Medicine and Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 1991 - 1993
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, The Rockefeller University, 1988 - 1991
    Select Honors and Awards
  • American Institute of Nutrition, Proctor and Gamble Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Research, 1987
  • Samuel Roberts Noble Fellow, 1985-1987
  • Harold Stirling Vanderbilt Scholar in Biochemistry, 1982-1987
  • Regents Scholar of New York, 1976-1978

Field of Study

I have always looked for my work to be four things: fun, interesting, challenging and useful. TB is one of the world’s great neglected diseases, but it is also one of the world’s great biological puzzles. I love working with very talented people the world over to tackle challenging and important biological problems.